EXTRAORDINARY STORIES ABOUT ORDINARY THINGS Posted March 15, 2013 by Daniel Ostroff

Extraordinary Stories About Ordinary Things is a new exhibition at London’s DESIGN MUSEUM.

Extraordinary Stories About Ordinary Things is a new exhibition at London’s DESIGN MUSEUM.  The exhibition, which is divided into six different themes (including Modernism, plastic and fashion) will include pieces such as the Anglepoise Lamp, Charles & Ray Eames’ LAR Armchair and James Dyson’s G-Force Cyclonic Vacuum Cleaner. The purpose of the exhibition is to explore the impact that industrial design can have on everyday life.

The inclusion of a fashion section in the exhibition is perhaps the biggest surprise. However, the opening earlier this year of a Christian Louboutin exhibition and the museum’s current show exploring contemporary jewellery have set a precedent for an increasing diversification of the institute’s focus.

Extraordinary Stories about Ordinary Things will run until 2015, with the objects on display rotated on a yearly basis.

The exhibition, which will also include pieces such as Jonathan Ive’s Apple iMac and Jasper Morrison’s Handlebar Table, is a teaser of sorts for the museum’s 2015 move to new premises in Kensington. The museum’s new site, the former Commonwealth Institute, will permanently devote its top floor to displaying the museum’s collection of 20th-Century design.

Speaking about the exhibition, the museum’s director Deyan Sudjic said: “Design matters at every level. It is what makes daily life a little better; it is about the big economic changes that the world is going through. It is about the designers and the manufacturers, but it is also about the users. It is a unique way of making sense of the world around us.”

The exhibition marks a return to public display for select pieces from the museum’s 3,000 piece permanent collection, highlights of which were shown for the first time in five years as part of the 2011 exhibition This is Design. In March this year, the museum launched an iPad app that allows users to explore 59 objects from the collection.

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