Eames Great-Grandson Shares History at Burlington Store Opening Posted December 15, 2010 by Daniel Ostroff

From Seven Days, Vermont’s independent voice: “In addition to offering the usual wine and cheese, Ciano arranged for a 40-year-old avant-garde film by Charles and Ray Eames to be projected on a shop wall. And the great-grandson of that dynamic design duo, Burlington resident Ross Atwood, gave a talk on the Eames’ continuing influence on American furniture.”

From Seven Days, Vermont’s independent voice:

Eames Great-Grandson Shares History at Burlington Store Opening

Great-Grandson

An article by Kevin J. Kelley, photograph by Matthew Thorsen.

Excerpt: “Burlington is missing something it used to have,” declares Liza Ciano. She aims to help bring back what she sees as a creative-merchandising gap through her store, Lotus, which relocated from College Street to 88 Church Street this month. Ciano views Lotus’ move and the attendant revamping of its product line away from yoga supplies as an “opportunity to offer something different.”

Fifty or so curious locals attended the December 10 opening of Lotus to check out that “something” — an eclectic array of high-design household objects as well as books on art and architecture. The event itself was certainly unlike most such openings. In addition to offering the usual wine and cheese, Ciano arranged for a 40-year-old avant-garde film by Charles and Ray Eames to be projected on a shop wall. And the great-grandson of that dynamic design duo, Burlington resident Ross Atwood, gave a talk on the Eames’ continuing influence on American furniture.

Karen Hewitt, founder and president of Burlington-based Learning Materials Workshop, found this “a wonderful way to open a store!” Some of the toys and blocks made by her business are available for purchase at Lotus.

“Connections between people and ideas were the most important part of the Eameses’ design work,” Atwood told the gathering. He made a fortuitous connection with the shop a few months ago when he noticed a Noguchi lamp on display in the window. Because Charles Eames had worked with Japanese-American sculptor Isamu Noguchi, Atwood went inside and started a conversation with Ciano, and that led to his presentation last week about his great-grandparents.

Read the entire article here.