Don Menveg, Furniture Conservator Posted June 25, 2000 by Daniel Ostroff

"I found my Eames splint in an Army surplus store in the early '70s," says Menveg, art conservator for the Los Angeles County Museum of Art.

“Don Menveg fell in love with its shape, but it was the lifesaving features of the leg splint that the Eameses designed for the U.S. Navy in World War II that made it so valuable then. “I found my Eames splint in an Army surplus store in the early ‘70s,” says Menveg, associate art conservator for the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, who is among those responsible for conserving the furnishings and wooden artifacts for the exhibit on the designers. Menveg paid $2 for the splint, one of 150,000 that were manufactured for the Navy and were made of lightweight but resilient molded plywood with a birch or mahogany veneer. Now they carry a price tag of $200 and up. Charles Eames, who believed that designers should provide solutions to human problems, later received letters from the Navy extolling the splints. A former student of sculpture, Menveg kept the splint hanging above his studio workbench for inspiration before placing it in LACMA’s permanent collection: “I just love the sculptural aspect of the piece.'”

Los Angeles Times Magazine June 25, 2000