Design Entrepreneurs: The Next Generation Posted October 1, 2003 by Daniel Ostroff

Charles and Ray Eames were intended only to be the starting point for “Design Entrepreneurs: The Next Generation,” the conference organized by Metropolis and sponsored by Nokia on May 19 at ICFF 2003. But the designing couple’s presence resonated throughout the day, as the new generation of design entrepreneurs showed its work and talked about the business of running a studio and/or a manufacturing and marketing program.

Design Entrepreneurs: The Next Generation

Metropolis magazine October 2003 article by Akiko Busch.

EXCERPT:  “Charles and Ray Eames were intended only to be the starting point for “Design Entrepreneurs: The Next Generation,” the conference organized by Metropolis and sponsored by Nokia on May 19 at ICFF 2003. But the designing couple’s presence resonated throughout the day, as the new generation of design entrepreneurs showed its work and talked about the business of running a studio and/or a manufacturing and marketing program. And finally, a dozen hopeful designers submitted their prototypes or finished products to be critiqued by a panel composed of established practitioners in such varied fields as industrial design, architecture, manufacturing, marketing, and retailing. All of which made sense for a day that set out to explore the many different ways of being a creative entrepreneur in the twenty-first century.

John Berry—a marketer for Herman Miller, the producers of Eames and Nelson furniture—put the proceedings into a historic context. “As entrepreneurs, Charles and Ray did not wait to be commissioned for work. They sought out problems to solve,” Berry said. “They were certainly influenced by their education in architecture and painting, but for them there was no significant difference between design disciplines. There was only the importance of applying good skills and thinking to a shared understanding of a common problem.”

Charles and Ray Eames also put a high value on the ephemera of everyday life. All the information they needed to do their legendary work they found in ordinary things like Mexican pots, seashells, cigarette packs; from a study of toy tops came an eloquent presentation of the physics of motion and spin; from the circus, a creative way to organize creative people.””

Read the entire article here.

 

 

 

Photograph courtesy of Herman Miller, Inc.